Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that this website contains images and voices of people who have died. The story of Aboriginal Sydney could not be told without recognising their achievements.

The City of Sydney gratefully acknowledges the people and organisations that have given permission to reproduce the images on this website. Every effort has been made to trace and acknowledge copyright, and to obtain permission from the individuals or their descendants depicted. If you have any further information about the people depicted, please contact the City of Sydney’s History Unit.

Translations of the Sydney language used throughout this website are derived from Jakelin Troy’s book The Sydney Language published in 1994.

The Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council is the custodian of Aboriginal culture and heritage within the Sydney region. For more information, visit Metro’s website. City staff refer to Metro for any cultural advice or representation under the Principles of Cooperation signed by Metro and the City of Sydney in 2006 and our protocols for working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities within the Sydney local government area. For more information about Sydney’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, visit the City’s website.

As mark of respect to the traditional custodians of Sydney, the City incorporates ‘Welcome to Country’ and ‘Acknowledgement of Country’ proceedings for appropriate events, functions and meetings. The City encourages other organisations in the local area to do the same and, as we receive many requests, the City has put together a guide to organising a Welcome to Country on the City’s website.

If you are researching your family history, the State Library of NSW has produced an Aboriginal Australians family history research guide, visit the State Library of NSW’s website to find out more. The Aboriginal Affairs Family Records Unit was established as a result of the NSW Government response to the Bringing Them Home Report to assist Aboriginal people in NSW to access government records of themselves and their families, particularly members of the Stolen Generation who lost connection with their families as a result of past government policies and practices. Find out more on the Aborignal Affairs website.

To find out more about Aboriginal cultural attractions and events in Sydney, visit the City of Sydney’s website and Sydney Visitors Centre website.